Black History Month

 

Black History Month February 2014

Americans have recognized Black History Month annually since 1926 when Dr. Carter G. Woodson first established Negro History Week. Later "Black History Month" was implemented as an initiative to bring national attention to the contribution of African-Americans throughout American history. The month of February was chosen by Woodson because of the birthdays of two great influential men, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

The Office of African-American Affairs is proud to present all of the events honoring Black History Month for the ENMU campus and community. Please join us in our celebration and feel free to call (575)562-2437, email enmu.africanamericanaffairs@enmu.edu or visit the office in the Alley if you have any questions. Celebrate Black History Month!

 

Kick-Off

Monday, February 3

11:30 a.m. CUB Lobby

African American Affairs will be tabling in the CUB Lobby. Stop by our table to meet the staff and see what we have to celebrate for Black History Month! There will be music and giveaways.

 

Cirque Zuma Zuma

Zuma Zuma African Acrobats

Monday, February 3

7:00 CUB Ballroom

African American Affairs and ASAB will host a Cirque de Soleil show! The Cirque Zuma Zuma African Acrobats were the 2011 finalist for America's Got Talent. The performance will include but not be limited to: contortionist, human pyramid,Stunts, and hurling through hoops.

 

Successful today and beyond

African Americans Successful today and beyond

Tuesday, February 4

2 p.m.

Sandia Room

Born in Brownwood, Texas, Mr. Miller is an alumnus of ENMU and current Campus Life Director. He will be discussing the question, "what is success?", not just as an African American, but as an everyday American in society.

 

What is Black Poetry Today?

What is Black Poetry Today?

Wednesday, February 5

7 p.m.

Ground Zero

As the inaugural Poet Laureate of Albuquerque, Hakim Bellamy, is a national and regional Poetry Slam Champion, and holds three consecutive collegiate poetry slam titles. Hakim will be doing a spoken word presentation and having a book signing on his book "Swear".

 

African Instruments in Society

African Instruments in Society

Thursday, February 6

2 p.m.

Sandia Room

Daughter of Lesotho chief, Dodson lived many years in South Africa and in Ireland. This presentation describes the role of music in traditional African society using drumming. Event is co-sponsored by the New Mexico Humanities Council.

 

HIV And AIDS

February 7th

11 am – 1 pm

Sandia Room

Dr. Keith Levitt, Regional Health Officer for Southeast New Mexico, came to this state via Los Angeles to "be of service to the New Mexico people." He will be speaking on HIV/AIDS and STDS followed by testing. He has had a career in Anesthesiology and Critical care; helping in clinic for the homeless and going to other countries to work on medical missions.

 

Nelson Mandela: A Tribute and History Made

Nelson Mandela: A Tribute and History Made

Monday, February 10

2:00 p.m.

Sandia Room

Dr. Ken Cradock, Chair of the Biology Department and Native to South Africa, will be giving a presentation on the life of Nelson Mandela. Dr. Craddock will discuss the trails and the triumphs of his life, from the perspective of a young college student who lived through his release and presidency.

 

Mardi Gras Buffet

Tuesday, February 11

11 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.

CUB Cafeteria

Sodexo will be preparing a Mardi Gras buffet to celebrate the Mardi Gras Carnival Season.

 

Genealogy of African-American Identity

Genealogy of African-American Identity

Wednesday, February 12

2 p.m.

Navajo Room

Robert Graham, Alumni Affairs Coordinator, will discuss his experience with a premiere early 21st century crossroad: The intersection of technology and identity through DNA testing. He will discuss what inspired him to investigate his ancestry, what he found, and what he sees as the future implications for this kind of research.

 

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow – Are we going anywhere?

Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow – Are we going anywhere?

Tuesday, February 18

2 p.m.

Sandia Room

Deputy Chief for the State Office of African American Affairs Darren Johnson, will be giving a presentation on how exploring the terrain for Blacks in New Mexico, and across the country, has changed from the 1940's on up to today. We will take a look at how communities across the country have held on to old ways and mores.

 

"Journey to Senou, Mali" -Book Signing

"Journey to Segou, Mali"-Book Signing

Wednesday, February 19

2 p.m.

Sandia Room

A former Peace Corps volunteer and presently a teacher from Taos, Ms. Bonnie Black, will be elaborating on her journey to Mali, the eighth poorest country in the world. (UN Human Development Index) and has one of the world's lowest literacy rates. Ms. Black relates her story to living in Mali and changing lives as well as her own. She helped every day women construct a quilt that brought them together. She lived and worked in Mali, Africa. There will be a Book Signing on her book "How to Make an African Quilt: The Story of the Patchwork project of Segou, Mali.

 

Hip Hop Mania Dance

Hip Hop Mania Dance

Thursday, February 20

7 p.m.

Sandia Room

Come show of your dance moves and dance the night away! We will have food, music, fun and giveaways! Come chill and hang out with the office of African-American Affairs.

 

America Today: Situational Awareness 50 years later

America Today: Situational Awareness 50 years later

Tuesday, February 25

2 p.m.

Dr. Frederick Greene, Associate Professor of Business Law and Management at ENMU, will be presenting on situational awareness today in America. Dr. Greene will be explaining where America is 50 years after the March on Washington and passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The talk will focus on the importance of understanding our past to help inform us as to how we should forge ahead in the future. It is a frank assessment of the progress, setbacks, and concerns that are a part of American society today.