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Dr. Brendon Asher

Title: Director, Blackwater Draw

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 125
Phone: 575.562.2910
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Dr. Thomas Brown

Title: Professor of Computer Science, Interim Department Chair of Anthropology

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 113
Phone: 575.562.2206
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Jenna Domeischel

Title: Blackwater Draw Museum Curator

Office Location: Lea Hall (LH), Room 163
Phone: 575.562.2103
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Website: enmu.academia.edu/JennaDomeischel

Dr. Everett Frost

Title: Professor Emeritus, President Emeritus

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 117
Phone: 575.562.2883
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Dr. John Montgomery

Title: Professor of Anthropology

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 127
Phone: 575.562.2180
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Vitae: Vitae
Website: enmu.academia.edu/JohnMontgomery

Education

  • 1983 University of Colorado, Ph.D. in Anthropology
  • Dissertation: Anasazi Household Economic Autonomy: A Lithic Analysis
  • 1977 Texas Tech University, M. A. in Anthropology
  • Thesis: The Mariposa Site: A Late Prehistoric Site on the Rio Grande Plain of Texas
  • 1974 University of Arizona, B. A. with Distinction in Anthropology

Bio

John arrived at ENMU in 1984 to direct the Agency for Conservation Archaeology and became a faculty member in Anthropology in 1999. From 1985 to 2013 he served as Director of the Blackwater Draw National Historic Landmark Archaeological Site and Blackwater Draw Museum. His research interests include historic preservation, Paleoindian archaeology, Plains archaeology, and computer applications in archaeology. He has served on the board of the New Mexico Heritage Preservation Alliance and is an active member of the New Mexico Archaeological Council.

He has published/co-published many major cultural resource management reports as well as numerous peer reviewed journal articles and research reports. In 2006, Dr. Montgomery was selected as the recipient of the ENMU Presidential award for excellence in university service.

In addition to his academic pursuits, John enjoys working with computers, listening to music (all types), and reading.

Research Interests

Research interests include the southern high plains, Paleoindian archaeology, archaeological site stabilization, historical preservation, and cultural resource management.

Dr. Kathy Roler Durand

Title: Professor Emerita of Anthropology

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 113
Phone: 575.562.2206
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Vitae: Vitae
Website: enmu.academia.edu/KathyDurandGore

Education

  • Ph.D. in Anthropology, 1999, Arizona State University
  • Dissertation: The Chaco Phenomenon: A Faunal Perspective from the Peripheries
  • M.A. in Anthropology - Bioarchaeology Program, 1992, Arizona State University
  • Thesis: Near Eastern Dental Variation Past and Present
  • B.A. in Anthropology, 1988, Arizona State University

Bio

Kathy Durand began teaching at Eastern New Mexico University in January 1993. She specializes in the analysis of animal and human bones recovered from archaeological excavations. Her fieldwork has ranged from Neolithic sites in Cyprus and Jordan to Chacoan and Hohokam sites in the U.S. Southwest. Kathy is a native of Phoenix, Ariz. In 2008 she was selected as the recipient of the ENMU Presidential

Research Interests

Dr. Gore's current research focuses on evidence of migration across the prehistoric northern Southwest using discrete dental traits on human teeth. She and colleagues have documented a close similarity for discrete dental traits between a sample from Chaco Canyon's Pueblo Bonito and a Pueblo III sample from Aztec Ruin. She also is conducting a long-term study into the ritual use of animals at Chacoan sites in northwest New Mexico. She has studied thousands of animal bones from Aztec, Guadalupe and Salmon Ruins to explore changes in diet and ritual practices through time at these sites.

Barbara Senn

Title: Department Secretary

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 113
Phone: 575.562.2206
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Dr. Heather Smith

Title: Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Graduate Coordinator

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 141
Phone: 575.562.2583
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Vitae: Vitae
Website: tinyurl.com/ENMUHSmith

Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
  • M.A. Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
  • B.A. Photocommunications, St. Edward's University at Austin

Bio

Heather Smith arrived at Eastern New Mexico University in 2016 to begin teaching and research at the home of the Clovis type-site. Her Masters thesis (2010, Center for the Study of the First Americans, Texas A&M University) focused on Clovis fluted projectile points using geometric morphometrics to understand relatedness in point morphologies and observation of shape trends across the North American continent. Her dissertation research (2015, Center for the Study of the First Americans, Texas A&M University) brought together geometric morphometrics and technological analyses of Clovis and non-Clovis fluted-point assemblages from across North America, especially Alaska/northern Yukon and the Ice-free Corridor in Western Canada, to address how fluted-point technology was culturally transmitted to the Arctic at the end of the last Ice Age and develop a better understanding of the cultural and adaptive contexts of the northern fluted-point phenomenon.

As a field scientist, she has worked on academic several projects, some of which include the Debra L. Friedkin site (TX), Bonneville Estates Rockshelter (NV), Owl Ridge (AK), Dry Creek (AK), McDonald Creek (AK), Serpentine Hot Springs (AK), survey of the Nenana, Tanana, and Susitna River valleys (AK), Chama River valley (NM), Creekside Village (NM), and the Epipaleolithic Kovrizhka site in eastern Siberia; as well as CRM projects in Alaska and Texas. She has also conducted laboratory analyses of curated archaeological materials at facilities across North America and emphasizes incorporation of curated collections in new research.

Research Interests

Her research interests include human adaptation and dispersals in the late Pleistocene, the adaptive role of lithic technology during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, and quantitative methods of material culture analyses with an emphasis on geometric morphometrics, GIS, geoarchaeology, evolutionary archaeology, and cultural transmission. With a regional focus in Western North America, Dr. Smith specializes in the transmission of Paleoindian lithic technology between areas south of the late Pleistocene ice sheets and the Arctic.

One facet of her current research expands investigations of the cultural transmission and adaptive significance of fluted-point technology to include additional Paleoindian projectile points from the Southwest, such as Folsom and other late-Paleoindian point forms, to gain a diachronic perspective of cultural transmission within the region. This project incorporates new spatial analyses of archaeological materials from the Blackwater Draw site and a collaborative project investigating regional variability in the spatial structure of archaeological materials and geoarchaeology at Paleoindian sites located throughout the greater Southwest.

Dr. Erik Stanley

Title: Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 132
Phone: 575.562.2322
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Vitae: Vitae

Education

  • 2015 PhD University of Virginia, Department of Anthropology
  • 2005 MA Florida State University, Department of Anthropology
  • 2003 BA University of Central Florida, Department of Anthropology

Research Interests

Dr. Stanley is currently accepting graduate students (MA) in cultural anthropology who are interested in ethnographic projects on

Dr. Robert Stokes

Title: Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Agency for Conservation Archaeology

Office Location: Art and Anthropology (AA), Room 139
Phone: 575.562.2696
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Vitae: Vitae

Education

  • Ph.D. in Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, 2003
  • M.A. in Anthropology, Eastern New Mexico University, 1995
  • B.A. in Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 1990

Bio

Dr. Stokes has been practicing archaeology since 1988, much of which was cultural resource management focused. He has participated in projects in New Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma, Texas, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina spanning the early Prehistoric to modern Historic periods. After graduating with his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma, he spent 14 years working as a principal investigator with firms in Phoenix and Tucson, then 4.5 years as the New Mexico State Parks archaeologist in Santa Fe. As a result, he maintains research interests covering the Prehistoric and Historic periods, but focuses on the American Southwest.

Research Interests

Dr. Stokes focuses his research in the southern American Southwest, primarily the Mogollon and Hohokam cultures of the Pithouse and Pueblo periods. His research interests include community and household interactions, settlement pattern studies, development of forms of social control, ceramic analysis, and historical archaeology, including the Spanish Colonial and early Euroamerican periods. His dissertation research was a study of the development of land tenure systems in the Mimbres-Mogollon area as a strategy for avoiding potential interpersonal and social conflict and stress during the Classic (Pueblo) period. Recent research includes excavations focusing on Mimbres Classic period ceremonial structures, ceramic analysis for UNLV's multi-year Harris Site field schools in the Mimbres Valley and an upcoming ceramic analysis project of Mimbres painted pottery from the Lake Roberts Vista site, studies of the effects of inundation on an El Paso phase Jornada-Mogollon adobe pueblo, and the Jornada-Mogollon/Manso transition during the early Spanish Colonial period in the lower Rio Grande Valley.